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Next God gave us another chance with this boy
KOMO 1000 News, December 14, 2004

Next Severely burned, he beats steep odds
The Times, November 08, 2004

Next Integra's Website for Patients and Their Families now on-line

Next Charitable help uplifts burn victim
The Honolulu Advertiser, June 24, 2004

Next Super Sophie - any tougher, and she'd rust
Sydney Morning Herald, June 4, 2004

Next Shark skin benefits burn victims
Daily Southtown, Tinley Park, IL, March 16, 2004

Next Healing Touch
Memphis Magazine, June, 2003

Next Burn Treatment Helps Regenerate Tissue, Restore Normal Movement
The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, TN, December 15, 2002


God Gave Us Another Chance With This Boy


When 4-year-old Jose Basilio says, "It hurts here," he raises his arm to touch the back of his head.

That is nothing short of a miracle.

And he adds, "I am feeling a lot better."

A month and a half ago, a pack of stray dogs were fighting over something in Jose's grandmother's yard in Wapato, Yakima County. She yelled for them to scatter and saw that it was Jose.

"All I did was put him in my arms and was kicking the pit bull," says Monica Esparza.

The dogs tore away chunks of Jose's arms and shoulders. He had more than 50 puncture wounds.

Doctors at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle used an artificial skin called Integra to patch his wounds. Still, they didn't expect Jose to do this well

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Severely burned, he beats steep odds

When John Powell heard the "whoop," he said, he knew he was in trouble. While he was cutting apart a car in a Trenton salvage yard, sparks ignited leaking gasoline.
"It exploded from that point," Powell said. "I heard something go `whoop' and figured that was what it was. I turned my back and the flames were all over.

The next thing he recalls is waking up about eight weeks later in Temple University Hospital's burn center, barely able to move.

During his lost weeks, Powell, who lives in Cranbury, was kept sedated by the doctors who treated him with the latest in burn technology, including artificial skin grafts made by a Plainsboro company for which his daughter once worked.

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Integra's Website for Patients and Their Families now on-line

Integra LifeSciences Corporation recently launched a website for patients and their families who are in search of information on treatment options for burn injuries and severe scarring. Integraskin.com is dedicated to providing burn survivors and their loved ones with meaningful information about the latest treatments and reconstruction options. The site offers information on skin, burns and scars in general, as well as data on various burn treatments and reconstructive procedures. It discusses the Integra Dermal Regeneration Template as a recent advancement. The site has a survivor community section where visitors can "share their story". Links to additional resources are also provided.

www.integraskin.com



Charitable help uplifts burn victim

Marites Ulep, attending a news conference with Dr. F. Don Parsa, chief of plastic surgery at The Queen's Medical Center, said that thanks to the Aloha Medical Mission and free medical treatment
she received here, she will be able to return to her job in the Philippines. Richard Ambo * The Honolulu Advertiser

Four years ago, Ulep suffered severe burns to her face, neck, chest, abdomen and right arm in a laboratory accident in Ilocos Norte in the Philippines. She underwent six operations there before she
met Dr. Ramon Sy and others with the nonprofit Aloha Medical Mission, who helped link her to the help she needed and the more advanced technology available here.

Dr. F. Don Parsa, chief of plastic surgery at Queen's, performed three surgeries on Ulep over the past six months, including one using a new technique called Integra in which artificial skin is developed to
help rebuild damaged skin.

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Super Sophie - any tougher,
and she'd rust


Australia's most eminent surgeons, researchers and the three-year-old's parents all agree that her recovery from horrific burns when a car ploughed into her kindergarten in December are partly a result of ground breaking medical procedures applied swiftly, her will to survive and luck.

Doctors yesterday for the first time explained the technology behind the skin grafts that saved Sophie's life and proved Australian
parity with the world's best.


Photo: Mark McCormack
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Shark skin' benefits burn victims


Integra skin, sometimes called "shark skin" because it contains
shark cartilage, has advantages over traditional skin grafts.

Tim Gould, a former concrete worker, was set ablaze nearly three years ago when using a torch to cut steel. The torch ignited vapors and exploded a 55-gallon drum of Acetaline, resulting in third-degree burns covering 97 percent of his body. Samar Hadid was left with burns covering 85 percent of her body after a home fireplace accident in December.

Gould and Hadid have something else in common. Each has skin grafts that used what is sometimes referred to as "shark skin," a term mentioned by Hadid's husband, Aladdin, when outlining his interpretation of the doctor's planned course of treatment using Integra® Dermal Regeneration Template.

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Healing Touch


Thanks to a new burn treatment therapy, Arthur Biggers
is regaining use of his hands.

It's an average workday for diesel mechanic and volunteer firefighter Arthur Biggers. He reaches for the phone, clutches the receiver in his hand, and begins to talk. He holds a pen to fill out an order form. He locks his car door with his keys. All everyday activities, but ones that would have been virtually impossible without Integra, a medical procedure that is changing the way burn and other accident victims are treated after their injuries.

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Burn Treatment Helps Regenerate Tissue, Restore Normal Movement

Arthur Biggers - diesel mechanic, chief of the Mt. Olivet Volunteer Fire Department, hunter, husband and father - removed the pressure glove from his left hand and flexed his fingers open and then closed them into a fist. Next, he moved his thumb so it stood at a right angle from the rest of his hand.

Now thanks to a procedure he underwent on his left hand in August, Biggers believes that in a year he'll be back using the air tools, heavy wrenches, welding torches and other tools of his trade.

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